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Tim Tebow signs with the Eagles and America asks, 'How in the $%@& is Michael Sam not with a team?'

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Tim Tebow is a walking disaster as an NFL quarterback. Yet he has an NFL contract with the Philadelphia Eagles and openly gay player Michael Sam does not.

Michael Sam being gay is a distraction, but Tim Tebow as a jedi is just par for the course.
Michael Sam being gay is a distraction, but Tim Tebow as a jedi is just par for the course.
Handout/Getty Images

Tim Tebow has signed a contract with the Philadelphia Eagles to be their in-game announcer captain their cheerleading squad play quarterback for them. And the question we've already seen flash across social media is: How in hell can Michael Sam not get a contract?

To recap, Tebow has been a terrible NFL quarterback. The year the Denver Broncos went to the Divisional Round of the NFL playoffs despite Tebow's play, he was the 42-rated quarterback in the League. The Oakland Raiders had two passers rated higher than Tebow that season. His career completion percentage is 47.9%. In his 18 career starts his team put up 24 or more points as many times as they were held to 14 or fewer points (five times). Tebow has had the opportunity to shine over in the NFL regular season for two teams - the Broncos and New York Jets - and another, the New England Patriots, in the preseason. Despite having a winning record thanks to a stout defense, he has not done well as a player.

Yet the Philadelphia Eagles are giving Tebow yet still another chance in the NFL and Michael Sam cannot get a futures contract.

In contrast, Sam performed well in the only NFL chance he's gotten, the 2014 preseason. He was top-five in the NFL in sacks and was second on the St. Louis Rams team in tackles. But forget the stats: Sam looked far better in the preseason than Tebow has ever looked in an NFL uniform.

If you want to say you can't compare a QB to a DE, you're somewhat right. In this particular case, there are far more opportunities for defensive ends (when each training camp usually invites six to eight) than there are for quarterbacks (of which there are generally three or four in camp).

The plot continues to thicken: Why is Michael Sam not with an NFL team right now? Of course, the logical answer for the rejection continues to be that he is an openly gay man, the result of a promise NFL executives made to keep him out of the League a year ago.