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Podcast: The NCAA shifts out of North Carolina, but does it have a bigger LGBT problem?

The NCAA received accolades for moving championship-level events out of North Carolina. Yet the association allows schools to discriminate against gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender athletes and coaches.

The NCAA has said it will protect student-athletes, yet it allows member schools to discriminate against them.
The NCAA has said it will protect student-athletes, yet it allows member schools to discriminate against them.
Joe Robbins/Getty Images

When the NCAA announced earlier this week that it is pulling a number of championship-level events out of the state of North Carolina, people cheered. The NCAA was, according to the headlines, helping to lead the way against discrimination and anti-LGBT laws like North Carolina's HB2.

Yet all is not right in the NCAA. The association continues to allow member schools to openly discriminate against LGBT people with no repercussions. Gay coaches can be fired simply for being gay. Lesbian athletes can be kicked out of school simply for being lesbian. LGBT student-athletes and coaches are intimidated at some schools on a daily basis as fear is a dominant force in their lives.

We talk about the NCAA's move out of North Carolina. Is it a first step? Will the association ever address the deeper issues affecting countless more athletes than a few championship events in North Carolina? Or will the NCAA continue to turn its head and rest on the laurels of a big PR announcement and some inclusive training manuals the NCAA publishes?