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Last chance to see ‘Breaking Barriers: Sports For Change’ exhibit

Chris Mosier and Billie Jean King are among those honored by the National Center for Civil and Human Rights.

Chris Mosier tweeted a photo from the National Center for Civil and Human Rights in Atlanta on April 26, 2019.
Twitter @TheChrisMosier

Time is running out to see an exhibit that celebrates the achievements of LGBTQ and other marginalized athletes who overcame bigotry, racism, and other barriers to competing.

The National Center for Civil and Human Rights in Atlanta, Ga. has extended its Breaking Barriers: Sports for Change exhibit through Spring, due to popular demand. Among the athletes being paid tribute are Billie Jean King, Arthur Ashe, Michael Sam, Muhammad Ali, Jackie Robinson, Venus Williams, Jesse Owens, Patricio Manuel and Chris Mosier — our 2016 Outsports Person of the Year — among others.

Mosier tweeted a photo of himself at the museum last week.

“Totally surreal and unbelievable experience to see this in the National Center for Civil and Human Rights,” Mosier tweeted. “To be next to my childhood heroes (like Tommie Smith and Dr. John Carlos, Roberto Clemente, Jackie Robinson, Ali)... I have no words. Only tears.”

Actress Laverne Cox tagged Outsports in a tweet, congratulating Mosier.

The exhibit launched in 2016 with support from ESPN. In addition to appearing in Atlanta, the displays have gone on a nationwide tour, including to the Super Bowl since 2017. The center has also hosted conversations with athletes including trans boxer Patricio Manuel.

Joining Manuel at the center for just such a conversation this past January were Layshia Clarendon of the Connecticut Sun — Outsports female hero of the year in 2015 — and the first out NFL player to be drafted, Michael Sam.

Sam, who has been back in the news of late, telling tales of feeling used, weighed in on the Colin Kaepernick controversy at that event in January 2019.

Kyle Korver of the Utah Jazz is an ally against racism, who was singled out by the center for an inspiring op-ed he wrote about white privilege.

Other athletes of prominence include tennis legend Billie Jean King and former Olympian Tommie Smith.

Arthur Ashe is memorialized in another wing of the museum as well, where an AIDS Quilt hangs in his honor.

Next up at the center: it’s hosting a symposium focusing on transgender housing, employment and healthcare next month:

For information about the Center for Civil and Human Rights, click here or follow them on Twitter.