Kurt Warner and his wife, Brenda

Kurt Warner and his wife, Brenda

Kurt Warner resigned with the Arizona Cardinals for two years and $23 million after flirting with the San Francisco 49ers. His decision was made, Warner said, by a conversation he said he had with God:

“I told my wife probably 45 minutes into it that I just felt God say, ‘You’re supposed to be in Arizona.’ And I told her that. She tried to tell me to stay open [minded] but He just continued to confirm it and that’s why on the way back, I called [his agent] Mark [Bartelstein] and said, ‘Hey, let’s get this thing done.’ “

Kurt Warner and his wife, Brenda

Kurt Warner and his wife, Brenda

Kurt Warner resigned with the Arizona Cardinals for two years and $23 million after flirting with the San Francisco 49ers. His decision was made, Warner said, by a conversation he said he had with God:

“I told my wife probably 45 minutes into it that I just felt God say, ‘You’re supposed to be in Arizona.’ And I told her that. She tried to tell me to stay open [minded] but He just continued to confirm it and that’s why on the way back, I called [his agent] Mark [Bartelstein] and said, ‘Hey, let’s get this thing done.’ “

Warner did not say what percentage God takes for negotiations, but if he has a direct line to The Almighty, why does he need to pay Bartelstein? Warner’s constant public harping and promotion of his religion as the driving force in his life, while at the same time doing what we all do and chase top dollar, makes him the most insufferable athlete going (and the main reason and I thrilled the Steelers beat the Cardinals in the Super Bowl). Pro Football Talk nailed Warner’s hypocrisy during his protracted contract negotiations perfectly:

Warner supposedly was waiting for God to tell him to play for the Cardinals or retire. The issue of playing for another team only came up when Warner feared that the two-year, $20 million offer from the Cardinals might cause him to have feelings that fall squarely within the confines of one of the Seven Deadly Sins.

So here’s the question. If Warner’s ultimate motivation was driven in part by the possibility that he would be jealous of others making more than his multiple millions, would God really be all that concerned about aiding and abetting desires that are, at their very core, motivated by sinful objectives?

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