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Hungarian goalie stands up for LGBTQ families in response to discriminatory adoption law

Péter Gulácsi says living outside of Hungary has shown him the importance of accepting others.

RB Leipzig v Bayer 04 Leverkusen - Bundesliga
Péter Gulácsi has played soccer outside of Hungary since 2007.
Photo by Mario Hommes/DeFodi Images via Getty Images

It isn’t popular to stand up for LGBTQ rights in Hungary. But that didn’t stop one Hungarian goalie from issuing a strong statement of support for LGBTQ families in his home country.

Péter Gulácsi, who’s played outside of Hungary since 2007, shared his opposition on Facebook to the country’s new adoption law that bars unmarried couples from adopting children. With same-sex marriage outlawed, the edict effectively prohibits LGBTQ people from starting families.

“I’ve been living abroad for over 14 years,” Gulácsi writes. “The more time a person spends abroad or between different people, the more they realize that not everyone is the same, the world will only become more colorful and that love, acceptance and tolerance for others is the most important.”

Currently, Gulácsi plays for RB Leipzig in Germany. He first left Hungary to suit up for Liverpool.

Hungarian Prime Minsiter Viktor Orban’s government passed the adoption ordinance in December, in its latest attack on LGBTQ people. Last year, Hungary also made it illegal for transgender people to change their gender identity on documents.

Though same-sex civil unions are currently legalized, only 48 percent of Hungarians believe LGBTQ people should have equal rights, according to a report from Eurobarometer.

While Gulácsi’s post has garnered more than 51,000 “reactions,” Yahoo! news says the majority of comments are critical of his pro-LGBTQ stance.

“All people have the right to equality,” he writes. “I stand for rainbow families!”

As we say all of the time, the voices of strong allies are indelible to the LGBTQ cause — especially in sports. Last week, 800 professional soccer players in Germany pledged to support openly LGBTQ teammates. Gulácsi’s words are a nice addition to those sentiments.

For decades, European pro soccer leagues have been perceived as homophobic places. But these recent acts of support show the mentality is changing, and unsurprisingly, players are leading the way.